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Showing results 231-240 of 368 for cast

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  • article

    Yvonne Domings, et al., 2014

    The authors discuss ways that the Universal Design for Learning principles and guidelines help educators move beyond just providing access to content, enabling us to instead move toward providing access to quality learning experience ...

  • article

    Samantha G. Daley, et al., 2013

    This study investigated the relationship between emotional responses and reading performance in middle-school students. Although a large number of prior studies have investigated the relationship between emotion and reading, those studies ...

  • article

    Meia Chita-Tegmark, et al., 2012

    This article describes the mechanism through which cultural variability is a source of learning differences. The authors argue that the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework can be extended to account for cultural variability. ...

  • article
    Photo of a student speaking

    Gayl Bowser, et al., 2012

    The shift from print to digital text has the potential to offer greater access to information for a wide range of students who are unable to use traditional printed instructional materials effectively. There is, however, a danger with ...

  • article
    Illustration of a head with a maze as the brain

    D. Rose & G. Vue, 2010

    The future is imagined by “pre-creating” the Presidential Address at the IDA Annual Conference in 2020. It begins by reviewing policy changes from 2004, including the National Instruction Materials Accessibility Standard (NIMAS), which led …

  • book

    David Gordon, et al. (Eds.), 2009

    This policy reader comprises a notably wide range of articles that address the challenges and opportunities facing policy makers as they consider UDL’s implications for federal, state, and local policy. A Policy Reader in Universal Design ...

  • article

    Rose & Gravel, 2009

    Sadly for education, the commonly-available GPS exemplifies the principles and guidelines of Universal Design for Learning better than most educational curricula. This article draws playful and important parallels as it explores the features of the GPS through the lens of the UDL guidelines.

  • article

    Meo, 2008

    Traditionally curricula have been planned for an imaginary “average”. This has resulted in inflexible curricula that have not met the needs of most students. In this paper, Meo discusses how to integrate Universal Design for Learning (UDL) into the curriculum planning process to include all students from the start. She uses a high school level reading comprehension program as an example.

  • article

    Dalton & Proctor, 2007

    As reading content in a digital format becomes more important, a question emerges: how can digital reading environments be created to support all students? Here Dalton and Proctor discuss the variety of supports that could be included in designing a “Universal Literacy Environment” for students “in the margins”. In particular, they focus on how to help build learners’ comprehension.

  • article

    Proctor, Dalton & Grisham, 2007

    Today teachers are charged with including all students in literacy instruction, even those who have previously struggled in traditional school environments. One group that has struggled in the past is English Language Learners (ELLs). Here Proctor, Dalton, and Grisham discuss a 4-week study that used supported digital text to assist ELLs with reading comprehension. They found that embedding features did help promote learners’ use of comprehension strategies.